Violent democracies in Latin America

by Enrique Desmond Arias

Publisher: Duke University Press in Durham [NC]

Written in English
Published: Downloads: 468
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Edition Notes

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Statementedited by Enrique Desmond Arias and Daniel M. Goldstein
SeriesThe cultures and practice of violence series, Cultures and practice of violence series
Classifications
LC ClassificationsHN110.5.Z9 V584 2010
The Physical Object
Paginationp. cm.
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL24462511M
ISBN 109780822346241, 9780822346388
LC Control Number2009041170

Harvard professors Steven Levitsky and Daniel Ziblatt have spent two decades studying the breakdown of democracies in Europe and Latin America, and they believe the answer is yes. Democracy no longer ends with a bang - in a revolution or military coup - but with a whimper: the slow, steady weakening of critical institutions, such as the. Violent Democracies in Latin America (The Cultures and Practice of Violence, Cambridge University Press, ) Despite recent political movements to establish democratic rule in Latin American countries, much of the region still suffers from pervasive violence. From vigilantism, to human rights violations, to police corruption, violence persists.   This is an extract from How Democracies Die by Steven Levitsky and Daniel Ziblatt, professors of government at Harvard University, published in the UK by Viking and in the US by Crown. Violence in Latin America and the Caribbean is no longer perpetrated primarily by states against their citizens, but by a variety of state and non-state actors struggling .

The articles here represent a solid balance between mature democracies like the U.S. and U.K. as well as emerging democracies around the globe – specifically in Latin America, Africa and Eastern Europe. They are based on large and small cross-national samples, regional comparisons, and case studies. Data v murder Shining light on Latin America’s homicide epidemic Latin America’s violent crime, and ways of dealing with it, have lessons for the rest of the world Briefing Apr 5th edition.   A year later, in , with the overthrow of the Partido Revolucionario Institucional, Mexico became one of Latin America’s most exemplary democracies, sending its . How Democracies Die () examines the fundamental principles of democracy, with a look at historical cases – particularly in Latin America – where democracies have turned into dictatorships or authors examine how these democratic downfalls have happened, whether it could happen again in the future, and what could be done to prevent this dangerous and often lethal outcome.

Violent democracies in Latin America by Enrique Desmond Arias Download PDF EPUB FB2

“Violent Democracies in Latin America presents a nuanced study of the interactions between trade liberalization, neoliberal economic systems, and the political environment of post-authoritarian Latin America that subverts many of the previous ideas on the democratic transition and offers useful insights for scholars into the political economic context of the period.5/5(3).

Violent Democracies in Latin America is a welcome addition to cross-disciplinary studies of Latin American politics Violent Democracies forces the readers to consider each case study in its specificity and the common problems of the region as a whole, which is, I would submit, the only way to address the problem of violence in today’s Pages: Praise “Violent Democracies in Latin America is a welcome addition to cross-disciplinary studies of Latin American politicsViolent Democracies forces the readers to consider each case study in its specificity and the common problems of the region as a whole, which is, I would submit, the only way to address the problem of violence in today’s Latin American states.”.

The contributors—anthropologists, political scientists, sociologists, and historians—explore how individuals and institutions in Latin American democracies, from the rural regions of Colombia and the Dominican Republic to the urban centers of Brazil and Mexico, use violence to impose and contest notions of order, rights, citizenship, and Cited by: Violent Democracies in Latin America.

Daniel M political scientists, sociologists, and historians—explore how individuals and institutions in Latin American democracies, from the rural regions of Colombia and the Dominican Republic to the urban centers of Brazil and Mexico, use violence to impose and contest notions of order, rights.

Violent pluralism: understanding the new democracies of Latin America / Enrique Desmond Arias and Daniel M. Goldstein --The political and economic origins of violence and insecurity in contemporary Latin America: past trajectories and future prospects / Diane E.

Davis --End of discussion: violence, participatory democracy, and the limits of. Violent Democracies in Latin America (The Cultures and Practice of Violence) - Kindle edition by Goldstein, Daniel M., Arias, Enrique Desmond.

Download it once and read it on your Kindle device, PC, phones or tablets. Use features like bookmarks, note taking and highlighting while reading Violent Democracies in Latin America (The Cultures and Practice of Violence).5/5(3).

The contributors—anthropologists, political scientists, sociologists, and historians—explore how individuals and institutions in Latin American democracies, from the rural regions of Colombia and the Dominican Republic to the urban centers of Violent democracies in Latin America book and Mexico, use violence to impose and contest notions of order, rights, citizenship, and.

Despite recent political movements to establish democratic rule in Latin American countries, much of the region still suffers from pervasive violence. From vigilantism, to human rights violations, to police corruption, violence persists.

It is perpetrated by state-sanctioned armies, guerillas, gangs, drug traffickers, and local community groups seeking self-protection. Acknowledgments vii Violent Pluralism: Understanding the New Democracies of Latin America / Enrique Desmond Arias and Daniel M. Goldstein 1 The Political and Economic Origins of Violence and Insecurity in Contemporary Latin America: Past Trajectories and Future Prospects / Diane E.

Davis 35 End of Discussion: Violence, Participatory Democracy, and the Limits of Dissent in Colombia / Mary. "Violent Democracies in Latin America" takes the more nuanced view that violence, rather than a social aberration or the result of institutional failure, is intimately bound up with institutions and policies of economic liberalization and democratization in complex and essential ways.

Violent Democracies in Latin America Enrique Desmond Arias Daniel M. Goldstein Article (PDF Available) in Journal of anthropological research 67(2) July with ReadsAuthor: Jeffrey Sluka. Violent Democracies in Latin America Edited by "Conclusion: Understanding Violent Pluralism", Violent Democracies in Latin America, Daniel M.

Goldstein, Enrique Desmond Arias. Download citation file: Zotero; Related Book Chapters. Violent Pluralism Understanding the. “Violent Democracies in Latin America presents a nuanced study of the interactions between trade liberalization, neoliberal economic systems, and the political environment of post-authoritarian Latin America that subverts many of the previous ideas on the democratic transition and offers useful insights for scholars into the political economic context of the s: 2.

Violent Democracies in Latin America. by Neil L. Whitehead,Jo Ellen Fair,Leigh A. Payne. The Cultures and Practice of Violence. Share your thoughts Complete your review. Tell readers what you thought by rating and reviewing this book.

Rate it * You Rated it *Brand: Duke University Press. He is author of Criminal Enterprises and Governance in Latin America and the Caribbean (Cambridge University Press, ), Drugs and Democracy in Rio de Janeiro: Trafficking, Social Networks, and Public Security (University of North Carolina Press, ) and is co-editor of Violent Democracies in Latin America (Duke University Press, ).

Violent Democracies in Latin America [Daniel M. Goldstein, Enrique Desmond Arias, Neil L. Whitehead, Jo Ellen Fair and Leigh A. Payne]. Despite recent political movements to establish democratic rule in Latin American countries, much of the region st. With Violent Democracies in Latin America, Enrique Arias and Daniel Goldstein propose a major intervention into analyses of Latin American politics, statehood and citizenship, suggesting 'an alternative framework within which to begin a new discussion of Latin American politics in.

Contributors to the volume Violent Democracies in Latin America do an excellent job of opening new paths for exploring this abiding question. The book is well-suited for advanced undergraduates, graduate students, and scholars at all levels interested in Latin America, post-conflict or post-authoritarian states, or comparative politics in : Kedron Thomas.

"Violent Democracies in Latin America is a welcome addition to cross-disciplinary studies of Latin American politics Violent Democracies forces the readers to consider each case study in its specificity and the common problems of the region as a whole, which is, I would submit, the only way to address the problem of violence in today's Latin American states."--Isabel DiVanna "Canadian 5/5(2).

Violent Democracies in Latin America is an edited book that contains several articles based on different national case studies. In the introduction, the editors Enrique Desmond Arias and Daniel M. Goldstein offer a dense and complicated but nonetheless important contribution to our understanding of violence in Latin American democracies.

They argue that the existence of armed actors and the. book review Violent Democracies in Latin America by Enrique Desmond Arias and Daniel M. Goldstein (eds). Durham NC: Duke University Press, pp., £, ISBN 8. Violence and crime pose serious threats to the relatively fragile democracies of Latin America and the Caribbean.

This volume offers timely discussion by attorneys, government and policy officials, and academics from the United States and Latin America of the responses of the state, civil society, and the international community to these threats.

Police Reform in Violent Democracies in Latin America. Here at long last is a book that provides a masterful overview and critical analysis that will make this field accessible to students and. Book Review. Violent Democracies in Latin America. Edited by Enrique Desmond Arias and Daniel M. Goldstein.

Durham, N.C.: Duke University Press, "Violent Democracies in Latin America edited by Enrique Desmond Arias and Daniel M. Goldstein," American Journal of Sociologyno. 6 (May ):   America’s Coup Machine: Destroying Democracy Since by April 8, April 8, Written by Nicolas J.

Davies / AlterNet April 8, April 8, The book is essential reading for public security and development specialists looking for a deeper understanding of the drivers of violence in Latin America and the Caribbean, and insights into how to avoid repeating the mistakes of the past.' Robert Muggah - Research Director, Instituto Igarapé, Brazil.

If there is an urgent book for you to read at this moment, it is How Democracies Die." — E.J. Dionne Jr., co-author of One Nation After Trump "Levitsky and Ziblatt are leading scholars of democracy in other parts of the world, who with great energy and integrity now apply their expertise to the current problems of the United s:   If there is an urgent book for you to read at this moment, it is How Democracies Die." — E.J.

Dionne Jr., co-author of One Nation After Trump "Levitsky and Ziblatt are leading scholars of democracy in other parts of the world, who with great energy and integrity now apply their expertise to the current problems of the United States/5(4). Violent Peace proposes a conceptual scheme for analyzing militarized conflict and supports this framework with evidence from the history of Latin America.

His model has greater explanatory power when applied to this conflict-ridden region than a model emphasizing U.S. power, levels of democracy, or the balance of power. This volume aims to establish that the period between the end of the Second World War II and the beginning of the Cold War (–5 to –8) hitherto neglected, represents an important conjuncture in the political and social history of twentieth-century Latin America.By Óscar Arias With the exception of Fidel Castro's Cuba, the Western Hemisphere is now exclusively ruled by democratically elected leaders.

Democracy has come a long way in Latin America and we can draw encouragement from the region's historic rejection of military dictatorships and bloody civil conflicts (although the one in Colombia continues unabated).‘Time for Reforms’ 1 addressed the issue of the quality of democracies in Latin America in a panel attended by Leonardo Morlino and other contributors to the analysis presented in these pages, generating a stimulating debate that highlighted the policy relevance of the research results.